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One man’s dream, A nation’s legacy
by John Grigg

Tim Schmalz is an artist, a hockey fan and a patriot. During a visit to Canada’s capital city of Ottawa, Schmalz made a point of searching out the national hockey monument. But he ran into a problem. There wasn’t one.

Schmalz was flabbergasted. It never occurred to him there wouldn’t be a monument to Canada’s game in Canada. So he decided there was only one thing to do: Create one himself.


(read the entire article here)


Sculptor plans hockey monument
By Bill Walker

Tim Schmalz doesn’t play hockey and never has. But the 39-year-old’s love of the game has led the world-renowned sculptor to undertake the ambitious plan of creating a 50-foot high bronze national hockey monument. “Growing up in Elmira, I was literally inundated by hockey culture and I just could not believe that we as a nation don’t have (a monument) to the game,” Schmalz said Thursday. “Hockey plays a big role in the makeup of what it means to be Canadian, even if you’re like me and never played the game. It’s one of the defining things.” Schmalz isn’t some novice with a grand idea. He’s done carvings and sculptures in churches and cathedrals around the world. His work includes the largest bronze sculpture of St. Patrick in Ireland (located at the Our Lady of Knock shrine). He also did one of the largest sculptures in Bethlehem for the millennium. It’s of the holy family. He also has grand plans for the hockey monument. He’s looking at doing a bronze sculpture with the top featuring frozen trees that form a maple leaf. Below the maple leaf there will be a variety of life-size hockey players in different poses. The carving alone would cost $400,000. So far he has raised $10,000. While he doesn’t have a location picked out for the monument, he does envision an NHL-sized piece of white marble where visitors can walk around and look at black granite pucks dotting the surface. The pucks would commemorate contributions from people around the world to Canada’s game. The carving alone would cost $400,000. So far he has raised $10,000. While he doesn’t have a location picked out for the monument, he does envision an NHL-sized piece of white marble where visitors can walk around and look at black granite pucks dotting the surface. The pucks would commemorate contributions from people around the world to Canada’s game. The sculptor plans to pay for the creation by having Canadians donate spare loonies. “Right now all I’m worried about is getting this thing done in bronze,” said Schmalz, who hopes to have the money raised by the spring of 2010. “Right now every loonie I get is sacred. I’ve had some corporations and some municipalities say they would give me the land and help me with all that stuff.” Schmalz isn’t naive enough to think that loonies alone will foot the bill. He’s developed a series of miniature carvings on hockey pucks he plans to market with proceeds from sales going into the monument project. Schmalz only works on the project when he takes it to various cities across Canada. Hockey fans will get a chance to see Schmalz’s 10-foot wooden model of the monument at Hockey Day in Hanover on Saturday. He will be in Owen Sound Saturday night for the Attack’s game with the Erie Otters. “This is probably the last year in the Hanover arena for us so we looked for things to surround our day which are fun for the kids,” said Hockey Day co-chair Steve Fitzsimmons. “Having Tim come is a real coup for us.”


Hockey more than a game to Canadians, says artist sculpting monument
by STEPHEN BRUN

Tim Schmalz says he never played hockey, and was never a fan of the game.
That admission might seem a bit stranger considering he was born in the hometown of a Canadian hockey legend, lives in a hockey-mad province, and is sculpting what he hopes will become a national hockey monument.
But Schmalz, who is travelling across the country sculpting what will become the blueprint for his monument, said not being attached to the game has given him a strong perspective on the game’s connection with the nation.
“It’s not just a game when you see how it grips a whole nation. To call it a game is an understatement.
“In 100 years, when we look back at Canada, hockey is something historians are going to look at quite seriously,” he said. “When every single person was glued to the radio with their heart in their throat, it’s not a game anymore. I truly believe if we did not have hockey, we would not have a Canada the way it looks right now.”
A native of St. Jacobs, Ont., just outside Kitchener — home of Toronto Maple Leafs great Darryl Sittler — Schmalz said he was shocked to find out there was no national monument for Canada’s beloved game.
The sculptor was at the Charlottetown Civic Centre all day Saturday, giving Islanders the opportunity to see the 10-foot model that will eventually become a 50-foot bronze monument to hockey.
The top of the sculpture features a maple leaf with winter trees carved inside. An ice rink comes out of the leaf in 3D-like fashion with hockey players gliding toward the front, each representing different historical periods of the game.
The back displays children playing on a frozen-pond rink, surrounded by trees and the same maple leaf and tree design as the front at the top. Since the large block of wood is covered in a layer of wax, Schmalz must first heat the blades of his carving tools, affording him only seconds to make the proper etchings before the wax cools and hardens.
Beginning at Signal Hill, N.L,, he has been working on the model at each stop, turning the entire country into his studio. “Here in Charlottetown, I’ve finally got an amazing smile on the hockey girl in the front figure,” he said as he whittles away at the facial features of a young, female player near the base of the sculpture.
“I did want to put a woman forefront on the piece, but because of all the equipment you can’t show in her body that she’s a woman, so in the model it’s all condensed into an inch-big face that has to show everything about the feminine spirit.” He said many contemporary artists consider sports a low-brow subject, but points to the ancient Greek idolization of athletics through sculpture as a sign that hockey should be immortalized in Canada.
“I don’t like the idea that an artist is someone who’s separate from the community,” he said. “I think that’s reflected in a lot of the abstract artwork that’s basically incomprehensible to Canadians. There should be a strong relationship between the community and functional artwork that you can read like a book.”
Schmalz hopes to put the finishing touches on the model at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, B.C., but said he and a team will start fabricating the large bronze monument before he finishes his journey. The artist is asking for $1 donations throughout his journey to Vancouver so that all Canadians can feel they played a part in the monument. “To be built, not by a huge corporation or a cheque signed by the federal government, but by hockey fans donating loonies all across Canada, it is very symbolic.
“If Canadian hockey fans want to see it built — and it looks like they do — they will build it. When this piece is 50-feet tall, wherever it ends up being placed, they can say, ‘I built that’.”


Honoring a nation’s history
By Lou Lafrado

WINDSOR, NOVA SCOTIA, Canada – North and slightly west of Alamogordo, New Mexico stands a monolith in desert valley surrounded by a chain-link fence festooned with photos. Photos of the first atomic blast taken with high-speed cameras. The black monolith stands in appropriate silence as a marker to that first blast and the history it wrought. Twice each year visitors are permitted into the site through Stallion Gate off route 380.

The site is grim and disturbing when thinking of the impact of that night in the desert.

Canadian artist, Tim Schmalz went looking for a monument in Canada not long ago. Funny thing happened on the way to the monument. There wasn’t one! Schmalz was visiting Ottawa and expected to seek and find the monument to Canada’s past time, ice hockey.
(read the entire article here)


Hockey moves artist to sculpt national monument
By SHARON LEM

Tim Schmaltz wanted to take a look at the national hockey monument during a recent trip to Ottawa. But he was disappointed. "I wanted to see Canada's national hockey monument, but I couldn't find one sculpture in Canada that represents hockey in general," said Schmaltz, a 38-year-old artist from St. Jacob's, which is in the Waterloo area.

"I found one in the U.S., but hockey was born in Canada. Being Canadian, I wanted to celebrate Canadian culture, so I created a huge design to celebrate hockey in Canada," he said.

Schmaltz, an avid hockey fan, has created a three-metre wooden carving he hopes will one day be cast into a 15-metre bronze sculpture. Schmaltz is taking the sculpture coast to coast and will stop in towns and cities to carve the monument. On his own dime, Schmaltz used his truck to drive the wooden carving to Newfoundland in September. It is now on display in Windsor, N.S. Schmaltz has been carving into the piece at hockey games, heritage sites, and anywhere hockey fans will see it in hopes of gaining support. "I decided to make Canada my studio. Over the next two years, I'll be driving across Canada asking hockey fans to donate loonies. It will be built with the souls of Canadian hockey fans," he said.

Schmaltz has been paying for his own accommodations and gas. "My reward is doing something great for this country and having something that will be appreciated. I wouldn't be doing this if there was already a national hockey monument sitting in Ottawa. I'm Canadian and I cannot believe we do not have our own national hockey monument," he said.


Birthplace of hockey hosts National Hockey Monument model
by Nadine Armstrong/Hants Journal

The Birthplace of Hockey has one more bragging right to add to the list this month. The Hockey Heritage Centre is hosting the National Hockey Monument during October as part of the sculptures cross-country tour.

The 10-foot wooden model arrived in Windsor, Monday Set. 29, and will remain on site for the next month as a tribute to the area’s contribution to the national sport. Sculptor Tim Schmalz said he could think of no more appropriate local to visit then where the game all started.
(read the entire article here)


Inside Hockey Article: Sharing in a Canadian Identity by Ashok Parmar

For those of us who are Canadians, there are many aspects of life that we can all share in and take pride in. From coast to coast in Canada, the game of hockey signifies a great deal of importance to many people. After completing a piece of artwork dedicated to Canadian war veterans, sculptor Tim Schmalz began to question why there is no significant piece of artwork dedicated to Canadians and the love that they have for the sport of hockey. (read the entire article here)

Hockey Now Article:
National Hockey Monument
Fills 'Huge Gap'
By Steve Fitzsimmons

For St. Jacobs, Ont. sculptor Timothy Schmalz, the Memorial Cup being held in Kitchener this past May presented a perfect opportunity. He designed a nine-foot high hockey monument, which he debuted at the event to the amazement of thousands of visitors. As well, all participating players in the event received a miniature version of the unique hockey themed sculpture as a keepsake. (read the entire article here)

The Honourable Greg Thompson, Minister of Veterans Affairs, and the Honourable Karen Redman, Member of Parliament for Kitchener Centre, join Veteran Howard Conrad holding the National Hockey Monument statue. Sculptor Tim Schmalz watches as his work is being recognized. A replica was presented to each of the team captains that took part in the Memorial Cup 2008.


CKWS News Article "Hockey Monument" - August 1/2008
A WELL KNOWN CANADIAN SCULPTER SAYS ITS TIME THIS COUNTRY BUILT A MONUMENT TO CELEBRATE HOCKEY. SO HE STARTED DOING JUST THAT.
AND TODAY HE WAS IN KINGSTON SHOW OFF HIS LATEST CREATION. NEWSWATCH'S STU HAY WAS THERE. WHEN SCULPTOR TIM SCHMALZ TAKES ON A PROJECT, HE LIKES TO GO BIG. WHAT YOUR LOOKING AT IS A 10 FOOT HIGH PROTOTYPE OF HIS MONUMENT TO ONE OF OUR NATIONAL SPORTS....HOCKEY. BUT WHEN ITS DONE, IT'LL BE 40 FEET HIGH AND MADE OUT OF BRONZE. CELEBRATING A GAME SCHMALTZ NEVER PLAYED BUT LEARNED TO LOVE. (read the entire article here)


HOCKEYTALK Web Radio News Shows with host Josh Brewster -

> Click here to listen online!


Western Star Article: Sculptor looking to elevate Canada's game
by CHRIS NOSEWORTHY

CORNER BROOK — There is something about the game of hockey that screams Canada, but even though it inspires and captivates us, its role in Canadian culture is decidedly ‘low-brow’ — that is to say it is on par with situation comedies and bingo games.

Ontario sculptor Tim Schmalz feels that for a sport which is at the centre of our national identity and which so often serves as a measuring stick for our successes and failures to be so underrepresented in fine art is mind boggling. He was in Corner Brook Thursday to continue his work on what he calls his National Hockey Monument — a project to both elevate and celebrate what the sport means to our nation. (read the entire article here)